Friday, 21 September 2012

Pamplemousse Financiers

It’s the second birthday of the We Should Cocoa Challenge sent forth into the world by Choclette of Chocolate Log Blog and Chele of Chocolate Teapot. To celebrate this milestone Choclette has asked us to create something chocolaty inspired by a cocktail. I'm not really known for my consumption of cocktails. (Well, except maybe in the Epsom Bar in Dieppe – but let’s not go there. No wait, on second thoughts, let’s….). On the other hand, I’m deeply fond of an aperitif and the aperitif for me is the kir. Fortunately, when I looked at a very official looking web site on cocktails, I found the kir listed.

Mel of Sharky Oven Gloves made lovely kir macarons for We Should Cocoa back in July using the classic crème de cassis and so I thought I’d create something inspired by my favourite alternative ‘kir’: crème de pamplemousse rose (pink grapefruit) with a dry rosé wine. (I'm eternally grateful to Catherine at l’Ombre Bleue chambres d'hôtes for introducing me to this little aperitif a couple of years ago).
Pamplemousse Kir
This is also a bit of an excuse to use the silicone savarin rings that I bought recently, but these little cakes don’t have to be made in rings – any small mould would do. This is pretty much my standard financier and friand recipe and it can be scaled up and flavoured differently with very little trouble. I filled the centre of the cakes with Greek yogurt, but whipped cream would be even more indulgent if you’d prefer indulgence. I topped the cakes with caramelised grapefruit segments. The caramelised bit isn't essential but it does create a nice contrast of flavours.
Pamplemousse Financier
This will make 12 cakes using individual savarin moulds of 7 cm diameter.

115 g icing sugar
45 g plain flour
75 g finely ground almonds
4 egg whites
95 g unsalted butter, melted and cooled
35 g white chocolate, finely chopped
Zest of ½ grapefruit, very finely chopped
2 tsp crème de pamplemousse rose (or use grapefruit juice or limoncello)

To serve:
Greek yogurt, grapefruit segments (pink or red, preferably), icing sugar and maybe a little more crème de pamplemousse

Preheat the oven to 170°C. If the moulds you’re using aren’t silicone, then brush them thoroughly with butter.

Sift the icing sugar, flour and ground almonds into a large bowl and mix together. Whisk the egg whites until frothy – don’t overdo it, though, they shouldn’t be stiff. Stir the egg whites into the dry ingredients until they're thoroughly combined, but, again, don’t overwork the mixture. Stir in the melted butter and the crème de pamplemousse or grapefruit juice. Lastly, stir in the chocolate and grapefruit zest.

Spoon the batter into the moulds – they should be around ¾ full. Bake in the oven for 15 minutes until lightly golden and springy to the touch. Transfer to a rack to cool completely.

To make the caramelised grapefruit, spread some icing sugar on a plate and move the grapefruit segments around in the sugar until they’re coated (it doesn’t have to be perfectly even). Place the segments in a dry frying pan over a moderate heat until the sugar caramelises on both sides – don’t overdo it or they’ll taste too bitter. Be careful when turning or lifting the segments because they’ll be very fragile.

To serve, fill the hole in the middle of each cake with yogurt (or cream), carefully place a grapefruit segment on top and drizzle with a little more crème de pamplemousse, if you happen to have some.

21 comments:

  1. Such a pretty and delicious treat! Love the grapefruit garnish. So fancy! Thanks for stopping by my blog! Have a great weekend, Phil!

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  2. Oh my, what a lovely idea. I love financiers and this sounds wonderful. I also love crème de pamplemousse, it's such a lovely fresh summery flavour. I have been buying something called "Very Pamp" in French supermarkets when we are chez nous, which is rosé wine with the crème de pamplemousse already in it (I think). I love it, although my other half thinks it's naff - but then he hasn't really tasted it !! When I tell him it comes highly recommended as a sophisitcated apéritif he will be impressed !!

    Please do tell more about Dieppe.......

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    1. I've never seen 'Very Pamp' but hopefully I'll get back to France before too long and I'm on the lookout for it. You're right - it's beautifully fresh and summery. I can understand OH's objection, though. It's very pink, after all, and 'très girly' as the French say. But it's also delicious. I could witter on at great length about Dieppe - if you're unlucky I might do just that one day.

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  3. Now I thought that Kir was only made from black currant, you have just proved me wrong and I have learnt something new. Have a great weekend. Diane

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    1. Well, you're right if we're being authentic. There are plenty of people who insist that it must be crème de cassis but many people (including me) will happily use crème de framboise, crème de mûre or (an acquired taste) crème de violette. Then there are red wine 'kirs' (sometimes called 'cardinal') and the 'kir' from Normandy which uses cider instead of wine. I'm afraid I've never been very authentic.

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    2. Our French teacher used to serve Kir Cardinal when we went to her house for lessons. I had never come across it before and wondered if it was a local thing - she hails from Lyon. Then when we were in Tours last month they were on the menu so I ordered one and really enjoyed it. I think it's just a red house wine with a dash of cassis. No doubt we will be experimenting with it at home......

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  4. These look really pretty, and using a fruit not often paired with chocolate is a brilliant idea!

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  5. What lovely, lovely recipe - and I presume a rather large glass of the Kir is required alongside these lovely little treats (hic!)?

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  6. PURE genius idea Phil! Still pondering on my WSC idea.......Karen

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  7. Oh trust you Phil to come up with something deliciously different. Who would have thought there was such a thing as grapefruit liqueur? Trust the French. These look so pretty. I've been looking for a large silicone ring mould for ever it seems, but have had no luck so far. Thanks for joining the party and an extra big thank you for sticking with WSC since it's inception.

    I still have no idea what I'm going to make and I only have tomorrow left to do it - aghhhh. I know nothing about cocktails, whose silly idea was that :-S

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    1. Thank you for setting the challenge, Choclette. It might not be much help but I bought a lot of my silicone bakeware at Auchan supermarkets in France and I know that they recently had a large silicone ring mould available at a very reasonable price. No guarantee that it's still available, though.

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    2. Thank Phil. I shall remember that if ever I'm passing Auchan ;-)

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  8. Wow Phil, this look amazing! Creme de pamplemousse rose is not something I would have considered buying but now I am tempted.

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  9. My goodness, it just looks so inviting - your photos are always wonderful:)! Loved the caramalised grapefruit in top, lovely combo!

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  10. Oh Phil, you are such a wonderful baker. This looks and sounds so wonderful. I would like to try a little of that tipple, I am intrigued.

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  11. You have made these perfectly. How lovely to use white chocolate for this cake. The presentation is beautiful too.

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  12. wow, they look so perfect and beautiful! Well done you.

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  13. Oh man - they are amazing. Well done, such a superb bake. Pinning this one ;0)

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  14. These financiers look delicious, and I love the presentation! I'd never heard of kir with crème de pamplemousse and rosé – sounds intriguing! French Wikipedia informs me that it's usually called kir provençal or kir soleil, which is wonderful name. I tend to stick very much to the traditional kir or kir royal, since I always have crème de cassis but not usually any other crèmes (except crème de menthe, which I can't imagine would be taste very good with wine). Thank you for the link to my kir macarons!

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  15. These look and sound fabulous. I will enjoy the search for the creme de pamplemousse and enjoy making and eating them when found! Love the caramelised grapefruit topping.

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